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Showing News articles tagged with Engineering for health

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  • Assistant Professors Iryna Zenyuk, Xiaocheng Jiang, and Rob Viesca

    Assistant Professors Iryna Zenyuk, Xiaocheng Jiang, and Robert Viesca received CAREER Awards, the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award in support of junior faculty.

  • Dripping water
    The Executive Board of the International Water Resources Association (IWRA) selected a Tufts team's paper as Honorable Mention for Best Paper of 2015. The paper used water insecurity to predict domestic water demand in the Palestinian West Bank.
  • Associate Professor Lauren Black and postdoctoral scholar Whitney Stoppel at work in the Black Lab.

    Associate Professor Lauren Black and collaborators are developing a novel tissue graft which could give new hope to pediatric heart patients.

  • Jenny Skerker working in the Civil and Environmental Engineering RV that captures air quality data
    Senior Jenny Skerker spent the summer studying air pollution around the tunnel system created by Boston's Big Dig.
  • Imaging mitochondrial dynamics in human skin for noninvasive cancer detection
    Tufts engineers help develop a new technique that could enhance standard criteria for early cancer diagnosis.
  • Multiphoton microscopy images demonstrating the variable composition and organization of the heart matrix
    Tufts engineers have developed new, non-destructive techniques to evaluate tissue healing following a heart attack.
  • Islam wins international prize for water research

    Professor Shafiqul Islam was awarded the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water Creativity Award, a prestigious international award for his work using satellite data to predict cholera outbreaks.

  • Summer Scholar Grace Aro
    In the  Summer Scholars  program, junior Grace Aro made membranes and tested their ability to filter contaminants out of water. 
  • Remco Chang poses in a computer lab

    Associate Professor Remco Chang, students, and collaborators at Maine Medical Center created a project to investigate how older men with prostate cancer use visualizations to better understand their own health risk information.

  • Process could pave way for engineering innervated tissues such as skin, cornea.

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