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Showing News articles tagged with Engineering the human-technology interface

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  • Abstract rendering of a wireless security network
    Continuing the work they started as a senior capstone project at Tufts, three alumni have filed for a patent on a wireless device that would help secure vehicles and garage doors against replay attacks.
  • Driverless electric vehicle on a track
    Professor Bill Messner writes for The Conversation on the current state of the development of autonomous vehicles.
  • Confined terahertz waves interact with tunable, two-dimensional electron gas in a novel slot waveguide.
    Tufts engineers have invented a chip-sized, high-speed modulator that operates at terahertz frequencies and at room temperature at low voltages without consuming DC power. It could make faster data transmission possible.
  • Associate Professor Lauren Black and postdoctoral scholar Whitney Stoppel at work in the Black Lab.

    Associate Professor Lauren Black and collaborators are developing a novel tissue graft which could give new hope to pediatric heart patients.

  • Anu Gamage poses with her inverted pendulum
    Summer scholar Anu Gamage, E18, spent her summer developing an inverted pendulum that could continue collecting accurate measurements and balancing itself in the case of a cyberattack.
  • Mike Zimmerman discusses his work on the first polymer-based solid state battery with Anthony Sullivan
    Professor of the Practice Mike Zimmerman is developing a solid polymer lithium metal battery, which would be significantly less likely to catch fire than the current generation of batteries.
  • A silk fibroin pin changes color from blue to red
    Biomedical engineers have created materials with embedded, pre-designed functions. The process enables the creation of mechanical components with functionality, such as surgical pins that change color with strain.
  • Imaging mitochondrial dynamics in human skin for noninvasive cancer detection
    Tufts engineers help develop a new technique that could enhance standard criteria for early cancer diagnosis.
  • Multiphoton microscopy images demonstrating the variable composition and organization of the heart matrix
    Tufts engineers have developed new, non-destructive techniques to evaluate tissue healing following a heart attack.
  • Bill Messner
    In The Conversation and the Boston Business Journal, Professor Bill Messner wrote about recent advancements in autonomous car technology and about the future of these self-driving vehicles. 

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