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Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Engineering the human-technology interface

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  • A robot hand and a human hand reach for each other
    Professor Matthias Scheutz weighs in on the growing role of robots in our daily lives in New York magazine.
  • A finger presses a lock icon on the screen in front of it
    Bridge Professor Susan Landau weighs on the debate over the limits of FBI access to encrypted devices in the Washington Post.
  • Headshot of a woman
    In the Sacramento Bee, Dean Karen Panetta discusses the future of human remote monitoring of autonomous vehicles.
  • A figure drawing of electronic drug delivery
    Tufts researchers led a team in developing an electronic wound dressing an electronic wound dressing that enables active topical drug delivery, with applications for chronic wound care.
  • Headshots of two men
    In the journal Advanced Energy Materials, Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and alumnus Anthony D'Angelo, EG18, published findings on a new class of fully zwitterionic polymer-supported gel electrolytes that could lead to safer lithium batteries.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    Research from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering on a new "smart bandage" was recently featured on the NIH Director's Blog.
  • A woman stands against a railing with a security area behind her
    Professor Karen Panetta explains the possibilities and challenges of developing new technologies to assist with diagnosing and treating medical conditions.
  • Vibrant green rods bent in an arc
    A group of Tufts researchers created materials that move in response to light, leading to possible applications for solar-powered products. 
  • A professor and a student with a large box with a QR code design.

    As a Summer Scholar, Computer Science student Faizan Muhammad, E20, is working with Assistant Professor Jivko Sinapov on a research investigation into robotics and augmented reality.

  • A man in a grey sweater stands in a lab with his arms crossed, smiling.
    Assistant Professor Xiaocheng Jiang and a group of Tufts researchers examined new developments in support extracellular electron transfer (EET) processes, which could have applications in renewable energy conversion and bioelectronics.

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