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School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Engineering the human-technology interface

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  • Lincoln Memorial
    At the Global Grand Challenges Summit, August Frechette, E18, reflected on the persistent gender gap in STEM fields.
  • Will Edmonds and August Frechette pose in front of the Lincoln Memorial
    Will Edmonds, E19, reports that collaboration will be key to tackle the 14 challenges featured at the recent Global Grand Challenges Summit.
  • A corgi plays in virtual pet simulator RoVR

    Alumni Jeremy Slavitz and Henry Zhou, E17, took a student project developed at Tufts and turned it into RoVR: a new virtual pet simulator.

  • May/June 2017 cover of Advancing Microelectronics Magazine
    An article by alumnus Peter Lewis, E14 and EG16, and Associate Professor Robert White was featured as the cover article in a recent issue of Advancing Microelectronics.
  • Aerial view of Tufts campus
    A number of engineering faculty and staff received seed grants through the Tufts Innovates and Tufts Collaborates programs. Awarded by the Provost's Office, the grants spark innovative ideas and interdisciplinary research.
  • Overhead view of Tufts campus
    This summer, eight Engineering majors received Summer Scholars funding to remain on campus and work on an independent undergraduate research project.
  • The new Science and Engineering Complex, under construction.

    As the summer comes to an end, campus improvements and construction projects are wrapping up.

  • Mike Zimmerman displays his work on the first polymer-based solid state battery
    The Boston Globe named Professor of the Practice Mike Zimmerman one of its Game Changers of 2017 for his development of a lithium-ion battery that doesn't explode, and lasts longer.
  • Hands on a laptop keyboard.
    Professor and Chair Kathleen Fisher recently spoke to The Economist about gaps in modern cybersecurity, and about potential fixes.
  • Wooden blocks with bar codes that can be sequenced and used to program robots.
    Adjunct Professor Marina Umaschi Bers is teaching computational thinking to young children, who learn to sequence a set of special wooden blocks then scan their bar codes to program robots.