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School of Engineering

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  • Silkworm cocoons in the lab.

    Professor Fiorenzo Omenetto recently participated in a HubWeek panel on adapting silk technologies into products and companies outside the lab.

  • CT scan images of human brains
    Professor and Chair Eric Miller explains how analytical and computational methods are coming together to create new advances in imaging technology.
  • Annalisa DeBari working in the lab

    As a Summer Scholar, Annalisa DeBari, E18, designed a battery holder that researchers can use to X-ray a battery without having to take it apart.

  • Professor Susan Landau sits at her desk.
    Professor Susan Landau wrote a piece for Foreign Policy about Russian hacking at all levels of U.S. civil society and how organizations and governments can respond. 
  • Professor Igor Sokolov sits in his lab.
    Professor Igor Sokolov developed a new, faster method of imaging matter at a nano level, which could change the way cancerous cells are detected in clinical settings. 
  • Professor Richard Vogel
    Professor Emeritus and Research Professor Richard Vogel has been elected a 2017 Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in recognition of his visionary research on water resource systems engineering.
  • Professor Karen Panetta
    Professor and Dean of Graduate Education Karen Panetta spoke to Business Insider about the growing role of artificial intelligence software and early-stage humanoid robots in pre-K and kindergarten.
  • Assistant Professor Kristen Wendell

    Kristen Wendell, McDonnell Family Assistant Professor in Engineering Education, studies how students learn engineering and science.

  • Associate Professor Matthew Panzer
    Associate Professor Matthew Panzer received funding from the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center to develop a flexible, lightweight technology for lithium-ion batteries.
  • Cyanobacterial bloom in the Pamlico River in North Carolina.
    Professor Steve Chapra and a team of researchers report that harmful algal blooms in large freshwater reservoirs and lakes are projected to increase because of climate change.

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