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Showing News articles tagged with Human-technology interface

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  • Dr. Thien delivers Botsaris Lecture in front of crowd
    Dr. Michael Thien of Merck & Co. Inc. delivered this year’s Gregory Botsaris Lecture in Chemical and Biological Engineering.
  • Illustration showing the silhouette of a human head and chest with lungs inside, set on a computer chip. Other elements include lines and circles pointing to lungs, and a DNA symbol.
    When Tufts computer scientists put their skills to work, they can change the world. Here are four projects addressing medical questions and challenges.
  • Robot Shafer looks into the camera, while robot Dempster is visible behind

    Robots can transform health care, transportation, work, and more for the better, as long as we imbue them with a human principle: do no harm. The Human-Robot Interaction Lab does that research.

  • Symposium attendees seated in rows of chairs listen to a panel of three people sitting at a table at the front of the room.
    On April 5 and 6, Tufts University hosted its first student symposium in cybersecurity policy, welcoming researchers to discuss the field.
  • Winners from the $100k New Ventures Competition pose for a group photo with their large prop checks
    The annual competition hosted by the Tufts Entrepreneurship Center celebrates innovation in business.
  • A professor and a student with a large box with a QR code design.
    Assistant Professor Jivko Sinapov, the James Schmolze Assistant Professor in Computer Science, was one of ten winners in the nationwide Verizon 5G EdTech Challenge, and sees it as an opportunity to continue to mentor students.
  • Illustration of a magnifying glass looking at line graphs. The magnifying glass shows a pie chart inside of its circle.
    We’ve long had more data than we know what do with. That’s finally changing, with assists from Tufts School of Engineering's new B.S. and M.S. programs in Data Science.
  • The geometry of a moth's eye provides inspiration for a 3D printed antenna that absorbs specific microwave frequencies from any direction. Credit: Hojat Nejad.

    Tufts electrical engineers and chemical engineers create novel optical devices, including an omnidirectional microwave antenna inspired by a moth's eye.

  • Girls of Code students sitting at rows of computers working on projects
    Through Tufts Girls of Code, Tufts students introduce school-aged girls to programming and teach them how to code.
  • Solar panels on a home's roof

    In Scientific American, Assistant Professor Deborah Sunter explains a Tufts and UC Berkeley study's findings that racial and ethnic minorities have less access to solar power, regardless of income.

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