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Marcet Wins First Place for Poster at AEHS Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy
Ph.D. candidate Tyler Marcet won first place in a student poster competition for his research "Coupling thermal treatment with microbial reductive dechlorination for the enhanced remediation of chlorinated ethenes" with his advisors, Research Assistant Professor Natalie Cápiro and Professor and Chair Kurt Pennell. He presented the research at the Association for Environmental Health and Sciences (AEHS) Foundation's 31th Annual International Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy on October 19-22 in Amherst, Massachusetts. [posted 11/25/2015]

Sylvia Wins Second Place for Poster at AEHS Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy
Master's student Danielle Sylvia won second place in a student poster competition for her research "Evaluation of Partitioning Electron Donors to Improve Chlorinated Solvent Source Zone Bioremediation" with advisor Research Assistant Professor Natalie Cápiro and Professor and Chair Kurt Pennell. She presented the research at the Association for Environmental Health and Sciences (AEHS) Foundation's 30th Annual International Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy on October 20-23 in Amherst, Massachusetts. [posted 10/24/14]

Pennell Authors Report on U.S. Subsurface Remediation Effort
Professor and Chair, Kurt Pennell, was one of several authors serving on the Committee of Future Options for Management in the Nation's Subsurface Remediation Effort that recently published "Alternatives for Managing the Nation's Complex Contaminated Groundwater Sites" by the National Academies Press. The report estimates that at least 126,000 sites across the United States still have contaminated groundwater, and their closure is expected to cost at least $110 billion to $127 billion. About 10 percent of these sites are considered "complex," meaning restoration is unlikely to be achieved in the next 50 to 100 years due to technological limitations. At sites where contaminant concentrations have plateaued at levels above cleanup goals despite active efforts, the report recommends evaluating whether the sites should transition to long-term management, where risks would be monitored and harmful exposures prevented, but at reduced costs. [posted 3/7/13]

Lantagne Discusses Cholera in Haiti on NPR
On the third anniversary of Haiti's destructive 2010 earthquake, Assistant Professor Daniele Lantagne discussed the outbreak of cholera in the country with NPR's Richard Knox. Lantagne was one of four authors of an independent panel report submitted to the United Nations. "If we had had the additional scientific evidence that's available now, we definitely would have written the report in 2011 differently, to state the most likely source of introduction was someone associated with the peacekeeping camp," Lantagne says. [posted 1/14/13]

Abriola Named Drexel University 2013 Engineering Leader of the Year
Dean Linda M. Abriola was named Drexel University College of Engineering's 2013 Engineering Leader of the Year. Abriola, who is the first female engineer to receive the honor, joins a prestigious group of engineering luminaries. Abriola will be honored for her leadership in environmental engineering, her commitment to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and her endless contributions to engineering in an effort to improve today's societal problems. [posted 12/19/12]

Abriola and Colleagues Win 2012 SERDP Project of the Year
The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) announced that Tufts engineers and collaborators are recipients of a 2012 SERDP Project-of-the-Year Award in the environmental restoration area for their project modeling groundwater contaminants on military installations. Dean Linda M. Abriola, professor of civil and environmental engineering, and colleagues at Tufts School of Engineering—including Professor and Chair Kurt Pennell; Associate Professor Andrew Ramsburg; and Eric Miller, professor and chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering—collaborated with John A. Christ of the U.S. Air Force Academy to develop innovative tools that, for the first time, can provide key information about a source zone's structure and characteristics, also referred to as architecture. This work, which combines high-end computational techniques and physical models, can help explain why contamination persists, how long it will persist, and what the best options are for treating it. [posted 11/19/12]

Pennell and Colleagues Wins NSF Grant for Nanotoxicology Research
Professor and Chair Kurt Pennell, Professor and Dean Linda M. Abriola, Research Assistant Professor Yonggang Wang, and Assistant Professor John Fortner at Washington University were awarded an NSF grant to understand the effects of surface coating aging on the fate and transport of several representative engineered nanomaterials (iron and manganese oxides) in sands and natural soils. Although most commercially-available nanomaterials are produced with surface coatings, little information is available regarding their longevity and impact on nanomaterial fate over time. [posted 8/23/12]

Cápiro Wins NSF Grant for Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents
Research Assistant Professor Natalie Cápiro and Kurt Pennell (co-PI) were awarded an NSF grant to design experiments and mathematical models to evaluate a new method for remediating chlorinated solvents, such as trichloroethene. Using organic compounds called partitioning electron donors, or PEDs, (e.g., n-butyl acetate) can help promote the growth of chlorinated solvent-degrading bacteria in close proximity to a contaminated area. The knowledge gained from the testing and validation of this novel remediation technique will provide a sustainable approach to reduce chlorinated solvent source zone longevity and remediation costs through an improved understanding of enhanced biological treatment. [posted 8/8/12]

Department Receives NSF Funding to Support Environmental Sustainability Teaching and Research
The department has received $1.6 million from the National Science Foundation to create a state-of-the-art Environmental Sustainability Laboratory (ESL) that will support multi-disciplinary experimental and mathematical modeling research to advance the fundamental understanding of the fate, transport and control of emerging contaminants in multi-media (air-water-soil) environmental systems. The proposed renovation will provide approximately 3,000 sq. ft. of wet-laboratory space and associated infrastructure, including a temperature-controlled chamber and analytical instrument bays. [posted 9/16/10]