Skip to main content
School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Biomedical Engineering

To filter by date, you must select both Year and Month
  • Assistant Professors Iryna Zenyuk, Xiaocheng Jiang, and Rob Viesca

    Assistant Professors Iryna Zenyuk, Xiaocheng Jiang, and Robert Viesca received CAREER Awards, the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award in support of junior faculty.

  • Web of silk nano fibers  able to withstand a load 4,000 times its own weight.
    Biomedical engineers have developed a new bioinspired technique that transforms silk protein into complex materials that are easily programmable at the nano-, micro-, and macro-scales, as well as being ultralight and robust. 
  • Members of Tufts SWE and alumni pose for a group photo
    The Tufts chapter of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) was recently awarded the organization's Outstanding Collegiate Section Gold Award, which is the highest-level SWE award for a collegiate section.
  • Anderson Hall with Engineers Week banner hanging over the entrance
    From February 19-25, Tufts School of Engineering is celebrating National Engineers Week. See the Engineering Student Council website for the full schedule of panel discussions, events, and competitions.
  • Associate Professor Lauren Black and postdoctoral scholar Whitney Stoppel at work in the Black Lab.

    Associate Professor Lauren Black and collaborators are developing a novel tissue graft which could give new hope to pediatric heart patients.

  • A silk fibroin pin changes color from blue to red
    Biomedical engineers have created materials with embedded, pre-designed functions. The process enables the creation of mechanical components with functionality, such as surgical pins that change color with strain.
  • Imaging mitochondrial dynamics in human skin for noninvasive cancer detection
    Tufts engineers help develop a new technique that could enhance standard criteria for early cancer diagnosis.
  • Multiphoton microscopy images demonstrating the variable composition and organization of the heart matrix
    Tufts engineers have developed new, non-destructive techniques to evaluate tissue healing following a heart attack.
  • Process could pave way for engineering innervated tissues such as skin, cornea.
  • Tufts engineers have developed threads that, when sutured into tissue, collect and wirelessly transmit diagnostic data.