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School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Research news

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  • Illustration of heavy rainfall and dirty water.
    Professors Elena Naumova and Jeffrey Griffiths, who have adjunct appointments in engineering, find that pathogens that thrive inside aging pipes and water transport systems can result in many costly hospitalizations.
  • Mike Zimmerman displays his work on the first polymer-based solid state battery
    The Boston Globe named Professor of the Practice Mike Zimmerman one of its Game Changers of 2017 for his development of a lithium-ion battery that doesn't explode, and lasts longer.
  • Wooden blocks with bar codes that can be sequenced and used to program robots.
    Adjunct Professor Marina Umaschi Bers is teaching computational thinking to young children, who learn to sequence a set of special wooden blocks then scan their bar codes to program robots.
  • Team Tarsier poses with the check for their winning pitch.
    Engineering students and faculty delivered winning pitches at the 2017 $100k New Ventures Competition, hosted by Tufts Gordon Institute.
  • Assistant Professors Iryna Zenyuk, Xiaocheng Jiang, and Rob Viesca

    Assistant Professors Iryna Zenyuk, Xiaocheng Jiang, and Robert C. Viesca received CAREER Awards, the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award in support of junior faculty.

  • A robot sits on display before Tufts Department of Computer Science Professor Matthias Scheutz's robotics programming class.

    The Human Robot Interaction Lab is teaching robots how to trust and how to behave in ways that are consistent with our social and moral expectations.

  • Web of silk nano fibers  able to withstand a load 4,000 times its own weight.
    Biomedical engineers have developed a new bioinspired technique that transforms silk protein into complex materials that are easily programmable at the nano-, micro-, and macro-scales, as well as being ultralight and robust. 
  • Traffic in Boston's Chinatown
    Environmental engineers' paper on traffic-related air pollution in Somerville and Chinatown has been featured as an extramural paper of the month by the NIEHS' Environmental Factor.
  • Abstract rendering of a wireless security network
    Continuing the work they started as a senior capstone project at Tufts, three alumni have filed for a patent on a wireless device that would help secure vehicles and garage doors against replay attacks.
  • Close-up of a crack in a concrete road.
    Assistant Professor Rob Viesca has published paired papers that could help explain how dynamic fault rupture is initiated.

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