Skip to main content
School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Research news

To filter by date, you must select both Year and Month
  • Professor Emmanuel Tzanakakis in his lab.
    In Nature Scientific Reports, Associate Professor Emmanuel (Manolis) Tzanakakis and Ph.D. student Fan Zhang discuss their optogenetic regulation system which can teach us more about insulin secretion in the pancreas.
  • A detail photo of water on a spider web.
    A group of researchers, including postdoctoral scholar Zaira Martín-Moldes, studied the role of silk in bone repair, with findings published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.
  • Distinguished Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos in her lab
    A new study published in Nature Chemistry by Tufts researchers—including Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos—and colleagues demonstrates that methane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst.
  • Associate Professor Qiaobing Xu stands in his lab.
    Associate Professor Qiaobing Xu and a group of Tufts researchers studied delivery methods for CRISPR-based gene editing systems. 
  • Fresh carrots
    Assistant Professor Amy Pickering and colleagues found that unsanitary conditions in markets are a key source of produce contamination in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
  • A sample of the 3D intestinal tissue model.
    Tufts researchers built a 3D model with small intestine stem cells to test the progression of intestinal diseases, including cancer.
  • The students and faculty of the Jiang lab outside the Science and Technology Center
    Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor Xiaocheng Jiang was recently awarded a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)'s Young Investigator Research Program. 
  • Alum Matt Marber sits with a laptop at 574 Boston Ave.

    For Matt Marber, A16 and EG17, working while completing a graduate degree was the perfect marriage of real-world and research experience.

  • A photograph shows regenerated helical silk fibers colored by Rhodamine dyes, under UV light.
    A group of researchers at Tufts and MIT, including Professor David Kaplan and postdoctoral fellows Chunmei Li and Wenwen Huang, developed a way to build better silk in a new Nature Communications paper.
  • A girl holds a candle.
    Tufts recently launched the largest fundraising initiative in the university's history, aiming to enhance our ability to tackle the globe’s toughest challenges.

Pages