Skip to main content
School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Women engineers

To filter by date, you must select both Year and Month
  • A statue of Jumbo, the Tufts elephant mascot.
    The Tufts Elephant Conservation Alliance (TECA) has launched a crowdfunding campaign for a groundbreaking new project, utilizing drones for elephant conservation.
  • The team behind ZwitterCo poses with a large check.
    The annual competition, put on by Tufts Gordon Institute’s Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies (ELS) Program, celebrates innovation in business.
  • Two headshots of senior award winners side by side.
    Two engineering students were among this year's Senior Awards recipients.
  • An external view of the Science and Engineering Complex at Tufts.
    A number of Tufts engineering students and alumni received NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Fellowships.
  • Winnona DeSombre and Gabrielle Roncone with Ash Carter
    Computer Science majors Winnona DeSombre, A18, and Gabriella Roncone, A19, won the grand prize in the Defending Digital Democracy Project’s (D3P) first-ever Information Operations Technical and Policy Hackathon.
  • A headshot of Professor Kathleen Fisher.
    Professor Kathleen Fisher was part of a forum that informed the findings of a new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office on "Artificial Intelligence: Emerging Opportunities, Challenges, and Implications."
  • A headshot of Ellen J. Kullman, a white woman with short blond hair.
    Ellen J. Kullman, E78, A12P, will deliver the 2018 commencement address this spring. Kullman retired as the CEO and chair of the board at DuPont and currently serves on the Board of Advisors for the Tufts School of Engineering.
  • An image of binary code against a blue background.
    Bridge Professor Susan Landau spoke to the New York Times about the security risks associated with creating methods for "extraordinary access" to encrypted devices. 
  • A close up of a computer screen with code on it.
    Professor Kathleen Fisher explains how recent developments by DARPA have allowed computer scientists to use mathematical proofs to verify that code—up to 100,000 lines of it at a time—is functionally correct and free of bugs.
  • Professor Kathleen Fisher pictures standing in a dark room.
    Kathleen Fisher, professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science, will work with other experts to identify and respond to national security challenges posed by artificial intelligence. 

Pages