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Showing News articles tagged with Engineering for health

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  • Three headshots
    Three professors in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering received funding for new projects.
  • A man in a lab looks into the distance
    Professor Sameer Sonkusale explains how his team created “smart bandages” that can actively monitor and deliver precisely targeted treatment to chronic wounds in a story for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers magazine.
  • A brain image
    The Initiative for Neural Science, Disease & Engineering (INSciDE@Tufts) and The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) are collaborating on an initiative to decipher the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases by employing a new generation of human stem-cell-based experimental technologies. 
  • A lawn on campus with fall colours in the trees

    In 2018 and 2019, eight new faculty members join the School of Engineering.

  • A student climbing on a rock wall
    Jesse Grupper, E19, places fifth at the World University Sport Climbing Championship in Bratislava, Slovakia.
  • A figure image of membrane transport process

    Research led by Tufts engineers on highly selective membrane filters with applications in chemical purification was featured in a special issue of the journal ACS Nano on women-led investigations.

  • A figure drawing of electronic drug delivery
    Tufts researchers led a team in developing an electronic wound dressing an electronic wound dressing that enables active topical drug delivery, with applications for chronic wound care.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    Research from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering on a new "smart bandage" was recently featured on the NIH Director's Blog.
  • A woman stands against a railing with a security area behind her
    Professor Karen Panetta explains the possibilities and challenges of developing new technologies to assist with diagnosing and treating medical conditions.
  • A man in a grey sweater stands in a lab with his arms crossed, smiling.
    Assistant Professor Xiaocheng Jiang and a group of Tufts researchers examined new developments in support extracellular electron transfer (EET) processes, which could have applications in renewable energy conversion and bioelectronics.

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