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Showing News articles tagged with Engineering for health

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  • A headshot of a white man with brown hair
    Assistant Professor Brian Timko was named to the inaugural class of Young Innovators in NanoBiotech, established by the journal Nano Research
  • A roller coaster car full of people in the air against a blue sky
    Professor Masoud Sanayei analyzes the structural health of roller coasters.
  • Bright green algae on blue water.
    Professor Steven Chapra points to warming temperatures due to climate change as the reason for more toxic algae bloom in U.S. waters.
  • A white woman with curly red and brown hair stands overlooking a lab below.
    Dean Karen Panetta discussed the importance of K-12 engineering education to get women interested in the field from a young age.
  • A woman stands among many stone statues.
    While studying abroad in Talloires, France, BEST scholar Talisa Watts is seeing global health engineering and policy at work.
  • An image of blue and yellow cells.
    Research from Tufts University on a non-invasive optical imaging technique that detects changes in cellular metabolism is featured by the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.
  • A group of four men stand in a field with a tripod instrument.
    Professor David M. Gute traveled to India this spring to explore new ventures in the field.
  • A white woman with brown hair stands at a Tufts podium in academic regalia
    As part of WBUR's BioBoom series, Paula Soteropoulos, E89, J89, EG90, A20P, President and CEO of Akcea Therapeutics, and an honored speaker at Commencement, discussed the growing role of women in biotechnology and life sciences in the Boston area. 
  • A headshot of Associate Professor Daniele Lantagne, against a black background.
    Associate Professor Daniele Lantagne will be guest speaker at The Association of MIT Alumnae's annual meeting on Sunday, June 10, 2018.
  • Intestinal microbe metabolite indole-3-acetate helps reduce inflammation
    A team of researchers has identified a mechanism in which "good" bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract can help protect the body from inflammation.

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