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Showing News articles tagged with Graduate students

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  • A man in a casual outfit and in a fencing outfit in a split screen

    Peter Souders combines championship-level fencing with graduate studies in mechanical engineering.

  • A computer screen with code on it
    Doctoral candidate Hao Cui and Adjunct Professor Roni Khardon participated in the International Planning Competition.
  • A group of women sitting together and laughing

    By the numbers, the undergraduate class is one for the record books, with women making up 49 percent of the School of Engineering's incoming students.

  • Tolga Zeybek
    M.S. student Tolga Zeybek and part-time lecturer Khaled ElMahgoub published a paper at a prestigious IEEE symposium on antennas.
  • Prospective students interested in learning more about engineering graduate programs at Tufts are invited to join Dean of Graduate Education Karen Panetta for an information session and meet and greet on September 6 from 6:00-7:00 pm.
  • Close-up of a bucket and hands making a sand castle
    Interns at the Tufts Center for Engineering Education and Outreach learned about the process of engineering the fun way—building sand castles at Revere Beach, just outside of Boston.
  • A figure image of membrane transport process

    Research led by Tufts engineers on highly selective membrane filters with applications in chemical purification was featured in a special issue of the journal ACS Nano on women-led investigations.

  • A figure drawing of electronic drug delivery
    Tufts researchers led a team in developing an electronic wound dressing an electronic wound dressing that enables active topical drug delivery, with applications for chronic wound care.
  • Headshots of two men
    In the journal Advanced Energy Materials, Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and alumnus Anthony D'Angelo, EG18, published findings on a new class of fully zwitterionic polymer-supported gel electrolytes that could lead to safer lithium batteries.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    Research from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering on a new "smart bandage" was recently featured on the NIH Director's Blog.

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