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Showing News articles tagged with Human health and bioengineering

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  • App screen on a phone, showing risk factors
    Human factors engineering MS student Tom Ribeiro and colleagues won first place in two hackathons with their app to help users understand their risk of contracting COVID-19.
  • human breast cancer tumor (blue) near fat tissue (red), with abundant Collagen VI (green)
    Assistant Professor Madeleine Oudin and biomedical researchers at Tufts discover a new way in which fat promotes the spread of cancer.
  • Four masked students in the Ventilator Project space, plus one student in inset
    Five Tufts engineering students and alums worked with hundreds of fellow volunteers to develop a cost-effective ventilator that could be produced quickly.
  • lipidoid nanoparticles mediate delivery of gene-editing components
    Tufts engineers devise a way to directly deliver gene-editing packages efficiently across the blood brain barrier and into specific regions of the brain, into immune system cells, or to specific tissues and organs.
  • Three researchers looking at a computer together
    The journal Microsystems & Nanoengineering recently recognized Professor Sameer Sonkusale and team members from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Biomedical Engineering for excellence in two papers published by the journal.
  • The gene editing protein Cre-recombinase activates expression of the tdTomato fluorescent protein (r
    Researchers create neurotransmitter-lipid hybrids that help ferry therapeutic drugs and gene editing proteins across the blood-brain barrier.
  • Ascending lactate curve from sweat sensor during exercise
    Engineers measure real-time health markers using thread-based, wearable sweat sensors.
  • a silkworm and a microchip with silk-passivated bioelectronic devices interfaced with neurons
    Researchers demonstrate that a silk fibroin derivative can be an ideal candidate to enhance integration between bioelectronic devices and tissues.
  • Professors David Gute and Steven Chapra, Louis Berger Chair in Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Professors David Gute and Steven Chapra, Louis Berger Chair in Civil and Environmental Engineering, call for the reunion of engineering and public health.
  • Associate Professor Qiaobing Xu stands in his lab.
    Researchers from Tufts University and MIT team up to address potential challenges in mRNA COVID-19 vaccine development.

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