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Showing News articles tagged with Human health and bioengineering

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  • A woman stands outside a building
    Karen Panetta, Dean of Graduate Engineering, spoke with Machine Design regarding the latest advancements in medical device technology and materials.
  • Assistant Professor Madeleine Oudin in her lab
    Assistant Professor Madeleine Oudin has been named to BMES-CMBE’s 2020 Class of Rising Stars.
  • Diagram of components of the silk/extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system.
    Researchers at Tufts have created a novel 3D brain tissue system that better mimics the tumor environment in patients, allowing detailed study of tumor biology.
  • Tiampo Family Assistant Professor Amy Pickering with Kristy and James Tiampo
    Tufts University and the School of Engineering recently hosted a celebration with a lecture by inaugural Tiampo Family Assistant Professor Amy Pickering.
  • Faculty in the Laboratory for Living Devices invite the public to L²D Day on November 7 in the SEC
    Researchers at Tufts’ Laboratory for Living Devices link materials like silk and paper with technology, medicine, and diagnostics.
  • Researchers induced engineered pancreatic beta cells to secrete insulin
    Pancreatic beta cells “switched on” by light are engineered to enhance production of insulin in response to glucose levels.
  • Professor Sergio Fantini and members of the DOIT Lab
    Professor Sergio Fantini and the Diffuse Optical Imaging of Tissue Lab find new ways to non-invasively study biological tissue at greater depths.
  • A woman stands outside a building
    Karen Panetta, Dean of Graduate Engineering Education, has built an artificial intelligence tool that differentiates breast cancer cells from non-cancerous cells by analyzing biopsy images.
  • 3D silk scaffold treated with ECM and seeded with glioblastoma cells.
    Researchers find the use of brain-like extracellular matrix allows cell growth and treatment to more closely replicate physiological response.
  • close-up of silk fibers
    Fiorenzo Omenetto, Dean of Research and Frank C. Doble Professor, discusses the potential of silk to shape future technologies in Scientific American.

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