Skip to main content
School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Human-technology interface

To filter by date, you must select both Year and Month
  • Hand holding up cell phone, in four different images arranged in a square
    Associate Professor Mark Hempstead and collaborators analyze variations in the performance of smartphones of the same model.
  • Professors Khan, Rife, and Moaveni standing together, with Professor Rife holding a drone
    Associate Professors Babak Moaveni, Jason Rife, and Usman Khan are developing a mobile sensor network to analyze civil infrastructure.
  • Marilyn Sun, A19, standing outside
    Computer science major Marilyn Sun, A19, received an honorable mention in the Computing Research Association's Undergraduate Researcher Awards.
  • Professor Matthias Scheutz and Ph.D. candidate Theresa Law looking at large robot together in the HRI Lab
    Professor Matthias Scheutz received an Acorn Award from the MTTC to develop an autonomous feeding arm.
  • Buildings viewed from the air
    Associate Professor John Durant, Research Assistant Professor Neelakshi Hudda, and Tufts University School of Medicine Professor Doug Brugge are working with the City of Somerville to study how to improve indoor air quality for residents living in multifamily complexes near busy roads.
  • Alumnus Brian Eriksen with his son Nounn and their dog Tuck.
    Alumnus Brian Eriksen, E92 and EG94, helped develop an online service that links people surrendering their dogs and cats with those looking to adopt.
  • A man poses for a portrait
    Associate Professor Usman Khan has joined the board of the IEEE Transactions Journal.
  • A robot running
    A group of researchers at Tufts published findings on the importance of consent as an integral part of human-robot interaction and possible avenues for improving robotic systems with consent as a foundation.
  • A man in a lab with an instrument
    Researchers from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering studied methods to support the development of GaAsBi-based devices for mid- and far-infrared applications, focusing on the increasing the fractions of the element bismuth without losing material quality. 
  • Two college campus buildings
    A group of Tufts researchers from the Departments of Computer Science and Chemical and Biological Engineering were on a team that utilized PROXIMAL, a tool that predicts putative structural modifications, to use enzyme promiscuity as basis to predict hundreds of reactions and metabolites that may exist in E. coli but have not been documented in other databases.

Pages