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Showing News articles tagged with Human-technology interface

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  • Stock photo; globe with image of a key inside
    Alumna Winnona DeSombre, now a threat intelligence researcher at Recorded Future, was interviewed on The Cyber Wire Podcast on her research describing activity originating from servers at a major Chinese university.
  • Associate Professor Mai Vu and Professor Sameer Sonkusale, headshots
    Associate Professor Mai Vu and Professor Sameer Sonkusale want to overcome crucial obstacles blocking the adoption of millimeter wave communication.
  • Tolga Zeybek
    M.S. student Tolga Zeybek and part-time lecturer Khaled ElMahgoub published a paper at a prestigious IEEE symposium on antennas.
  • A man and a robot next to each other
    Professor Matthias Scheutz weighs in on the growing role of robots in our daily lives in New York Magazine.
  • A finger presses a lock icon on the screen in front of it
    Bridge Professor Susan Landau weighs in on the debate over the limits of FBI access to encrypted devices in the Washington Post.
  • Headshot of a woman
    In the Sacramento Bee, Dean Karen Panetta discusses the future of human remote monitoring of autonomous vehicles.
  • A figure drawing of electronic drug delivery
    Tufts researchers led a team in developing an electronic wound dressing an electronic wound dressing that enables active topical drug delivery, with applications for chronic wound care.
  • Headshots of two men
    In the journal Advanced Energy Materials, Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and alumnus Anthony D'Angelo, EG18, published findings on a new class of fully zwitterionic polymer-supported gel electrolytes that could lead to safer lithium batteries.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    Research from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering on a new "smart bandage" was recently featured on the NIH Director's Blog.
  • A woman stands against a railing with a security area behind her
    Professor Karen Panetta explains the possibilities and challenges of developing new technologies to assist with diagnosing and treating medical conditions.

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