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Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Electrical and Computer Engineering

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  • Associate Professor Mai Vu and Professor Sameer Sonkusale, headshots
    Associate Professor Mai Vu and Professor Sameer Sonkusale want to overcome crucial obstacles blocking the adoption of millimeter wave communication.
  • Tolga Zeybek
    M.S. student Tolga Zeybek and part-time lecturer Khaled ElMahgoub published a paper at a prestigious IEEE symposium on antennas.
  • Prospective students interested in learning more about engineering graduate programs at Tufts are invited to join Dean of Graduate Education Karen Panetta for an information session and meet and greet on September 6 from 6:00-7:00 pm.
  • Headshot of a woman
    In the Sacramento Bee, Dean Karen Panetta discusses the future of human remote monitoring of autonomous vehicles.
  • Two people in a lab
    Associate Professor Tom Vandervelde is investigating new methods for solving inefficiencies in electricity production.
  • A figure drawing of electronic drug delivery
    Tufts researchers led a team in developing an electronic wound dressing an electronic wound dressing that enables active topical drug delivery, with applications for chronic wound care.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    Research from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering on a new "smart bandage" was recently featured on the NIH Director's Blog.
  • A woman stands against a railing with a security area behind her
    Professor Karen Panetta explains the possibilities and challenges of developing new technologies to assist with diagnosing and treating medical conditions.
  • A white man with curly blonde hair sits facing the camera with students working on computers behind him
    Associate Professor Mark Hempstead investigates the history of microprocessor hardware and the future of secure microchips in a piece for The Conversation.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    A team of researchers led by Tufts faculty and alumni have created a prototype of a "smart" bandage that can monitor the conditions of a wound and deliver drug treatment. 

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