Skip to main content
School of Engineering

Georgakoudi named SPIE Fellow

Monday, January 6, 2020
Professor Irene Georgakoudi has been elected Fellow of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics.
Professor Irene Georgakoudi in the lab

SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics, has recognized Professor Irene Georgakoudi as a Fellow for her significant scientific and technical contributions in the multidisciplinary fields of optics, photonics, and imaging.

Georgakoudi leads the Optical Diagnostics for Diseased and Engineered Tissues Lab in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts. The lab focuses on the development of optical spectroscopic imaging approaches to monitor and characterize biochemical and morphological aspects of tissue in non-invasive ways. Georgakoudi is interested in establishing label-free, optical, high-resolution imaging methods that enable sensitive and quantitative monitoring of metabolic function and matrix remodeling in the context of conditions such as cancer, obesity, brain injuries, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

Her research has led to several patents on the development and use of spectroscopy and imaging to characterize tissues or to detect specific populations of cells, and she has published numerous peer-reviewed manuscripts, review articles, and book chapters on these topics. Georgakoudi previously received a Claflin Distinguished Scholar Award, an NSF Career Award, and an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Award. She also served on the Board of Directors of the Optical Society of America and is currently an associate editor for Optica.

SPIE is a not-for-profit society that advances emerging technologies through interdisciplinary information exchange, continuing education, publications, patent precedent, and career and professional growth. The society serves over 255,000 constituents from 183 countries. Georgakoudi joins a select group as one of 1,400 SPIE members to have become fellows since the society’s inception in 1955.