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School of Engineering

Named Professorships

Louis Berger Chair in Civil and Environmental Engineering

The Louis Berger Chair in Civil and Environmental Engineering was established in 1989 by Dr. Louis Berger, E36, H65, A69P.

Steven ChapraSteven Chapra is the Louis Berger Chair in Civil and Environmental Engineering. He has worked for the U.S. EPA, NOAA, Texas A&M University, and the University of Colorado. His teaching philosophy is based on respect for students, organization and professionalism, knowledge and enthusiasm for the subject, fairness in evaluation, and rapport and listening. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and was a member of the inaugural group of Fellows for the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP). His research interests include modeling water quality. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

 

Cummings Family Chair in Entrepreneurship

The Cummings Family Professorship in Entrepreneurship was created in 1998 by Bill and Joyce Cummings. The professorship supports a faculty member in the School of Engineering’s Tufts Entrepreneurship Center (TEC).

Jack DerbyJack Derby is the Cummings Family Professor of the Practice in Entrepreneurship, Tufts Gordon Institute, and director of the Tufts Entrepreneurship Center (TEC). Prior to becoming the director of the TEC center, he was the founder and now a strategic advisor to the partners of Derby Management. Prior to forming Derby Management, Jack served as CEO of Mayer Electronics Corporation, president of CB Sports, president of Litton Industries Medical Systems, CEO of Datamedix Corporation, and president of Becton Dickinson Medical Systems.

 

Frank C. Doble Professorship in Engineering

The Frank C. Doble Professorship in Engineering was established as part of the estate gift of Frank Doble, E11, H62, a technology pioneer and philanthropist.

Fiorenzo OmenettoFiorenzo Omenetto is the Frank C. Doble Professor in Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering. He is also the Dean of Research for the School of Engineering. He has proposed and pioneered the use of silk as a material platform for advanced technology with uses in photonics, optoelectronics, and nanotechnology applications. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and of the American Physical Society. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering/applied physics at the Universita' di Pavia.

 

Robert and Marcy Haber Endowed Professorship in Energy Sustainability

The Robert and Marcy Haber Endowed Professorship in Energy Sustainability was established in 2007 by Robert J., E79, EG80, and Marcy Haber, with the hope that this professorship will help to lessen the world's dependence on oil in an environmentally sensitive manner.

Maria Flytzani-StephanopoulosMaria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos is the Robert and Marcy Haber Endowed Professor in Energy Sustainability, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and a Tufts University Distinguished Professor. She has served as the editor of Applied Catalysis B: Environmental since 2002, and is an associate editor of Science Advances. She holds ten patents and has written more than 160 technical papers. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Her research interests include nanoscale gold catalysts, single atom supported metal catalysts, fuel processing and fuel cells, and single atom alloy catalysts for selective hydrogenation and oxidation reactions. She received her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota.

 

Alvin H. Howell Endowed Professorship in Electrical Engineering

The Alvin H. Howell Professorship was established from the estate gift of Frank Doble, E11, H62, founder of Doble Engineering, and was named after the late Tufts Professor Alvin H. Howell. Professor Howell helped foster a longstanding relationship between Tufts University and Doble Engineering, where he served for many years as a director and chairman of the board.

Aleksandar StankovićAleksandar Stanković is the Alvin H. Howell Endowed Professor in Electrical Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. His research interests lie in analytical and experimental work involving modeling, control, and estimation in electric energy processing power electronics, power systems, and electric drives. He earned his Ph.D. from MIT.

 

Karol Family Professorship

The Karol Family Professorship was established in 2015 by Steven E. Karol, A76, A04P, A13P, and Michelle M. Karol, A04P, A13P.

Jianmin QuJianmin Qu is the Karol Family Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Dean of Tufts School of Engineering. His research focuses on several areas of theoretical and applied mechanics including micromechanics of composites, interfacial fracture and adhesion, fatigue and creep damage in solder alloys, thermomechanical reliability of microelectronic packaging, defects and transport in solids with applications to solid oxide fuel cells and batteries, and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of advanced engineering materials. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in theoretical and applied mechanics from Northwestern University.

 

Stern Family Professorship in Engineering

The Stern Family Professorship in Engineering supports teaching, research, and scholarly endeavors in the field of engineering.

David KaplanDavid Kaplan is the Stern Family Professor in Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering. He is the chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and a Tufts University Distinguished Professor. He was elected a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and received the Columbus Discovery Medal and the Society for Biomaterials' Clemson Award for contributions to the literature. His research focus is on biopolymer engineering to understand structure-function relationships, with emphasis on studies related to self-assembly, biomaterials engineering, and functional tissue engineering/regenerative medicine. He received his Ph.D. from Syracuse University and SUNY at Syracuse.

 

 

Named Junior Professorships

John A. and Dorothy M. Adams Faculty Development Professorship

The John A. and Dorothy M. Adams Faculty Development Professorship was created through the estate of Dorothy Adams, in honor of her husband John Adams, E39.

Ayse AsatekinAyse Asatekin is the John A. and Dorothy M. Adams Faculty Development Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. She is also the co-founder and scientific advisor of Clean Membranes, Inc., a start-up company that commercialized the polyacrylonitrile-based membrane technology that she began developing during her doctoral research. Her research focuses on small molecule separations, designing novel membranes for water treatment, removal of multiple types of pollutants, and energy-efficient smart filtration processes. She received her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from MIT.

 

Ann W. Lambertus and Peter Lambertus Term Professorship

The Ann W. Lambertus and Peter Lambertus Term Professorship was established in 2019 to aid in the recruitment of outstanding faculty, to nurture the career development of junior faculty, and to enhance efforts to retain outstanding junior faculty. The professorship is available to junior faculty whose teaching and scholarship is in computer science in the School of Engineering.

Mike HughesMichael C. Hughes is the Ann W. Lambertus and Peter Lambertus Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science. He develops methods that find useful structure in large, messy datasets and help people make decisions in the face of uncertainty. His research interests include Bayesian hierarchical models, optimization algorithms for approximate inference, model fairness and interpretability, and applications in medicine and the sciences. He completed a Ph.D. in computer science at Brown University in 2016 and spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University.

 

McDonnell Family Professorship in Engineering Education

The McDonnell Family Professorship in Engineering Education was established in 2013 through the generosity of the James S. McDonnell Family Foundation and members of the McDonnell family.  The purpose of this professorship is to support a junior tenure-track position to vigorously and creatively lead a research effort in engineering education that supports the Center for Engineering Education and Outreach's mission and goals.

Kristin Bethke WendellKristen Bethke Wendell is the McDonnell Family Assistant Professor in Engineering Education, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Her research area is engineering education and her research group studies learning and teaching dynamics in a range of engineering learning environments. In 2016, she was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. She earned her Ph.D. in science education from Tufts University.

 

James Schmolze Professorship in Computer Science

The James Schmolze Professorship in Computer Science was established in 2015 with a generous anonymous donation. This fund is named in honor of the late James G. Schmolze, Ph.D., A09P, E11P, and Professor of Computer Science at Tufts. The purpose of the fund is to aid in the recruitment of outstanding faculty, to nurture the career development of junior faculty, and to enhance efforts to retain outstanding junior faculty. The professorship is available to junior faculty in the Department of Computer Science at the School of Engineering.

Jivko SinapovJivko Sinapov is the James Schmolze Assistant Professor in Computer Science. While working toward his Ph.D. at ISU’s Developmental Robotics Lab, he developed novel methods for behavioral object exploration and multi-modal perception. His research interests include developmental robotics, computational perception, autonomous manipulation, and human-robot interaction. He received his Ph.D. in computer science and human-computer interaction from Iowa State University.

 

Schwartz Family Faculty Development Professorship in Computer Science

The Schwartz Family Faculty Development Professorship in Computer Science was established in 2016 by Lynn S. Schwartz, M.D., J77, A14P, A17P, and Gary N. Schwartz, M.D., A14P, A17P.  The purpose of this fund is to aid in the recruitment of outstanding faculty, to nurture the career development of junior faculty, and to enhance efforts to retain outstanding junior faculty. The professorship is available to junior faculty studying and teaching computer science at the School of Engineering.

Liping LiuLiping Liu is the Schwartz Family Faculty Development Assistant Professor in Computer Science. He is interested in probabilistic modeling, classification, and clustering within machine learning. He also applies these machine learning techniques to ecology studies. Liu previously held the position of postdoctoral associate at Columbia University, working with David Blei on aspects of machine learning, and worked on commercial data analysis for IBM T.J. Watson Research. He earned his Ph.D. in computer science from Oregon State University.

 

Tiampo Family Professorship

The Tiampo Family Professorship was established in 2018 by James J., E83, A83 and Kristy F., E83 Tiampo for Tufts University’s School of Engineering. The professorship will aid in the recruitment of outstanding faculty, nurture the career development of junior faculty, and/or enhance efforts to retain outstanding faculty in the School.

Amy PickeringAmy Pickering is the Tiampo Family Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research combines tools from multiple disciplines (engineering, epidemiology, microbiology) to study enteric disease transmission pathways among households in low-income countries and to identify low-cost and scalable interventions. Pickering has conducted environmental health research in Kenya, Bangladesh, Mali, India, and Tanzania. She earned her Ph.D. in environment and resources from Stanford University.