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Showing News articles tagged with Women engineers

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  • A shot of people walking into a building shaded by leafy trees
    Professor of the Practice James Intriligator and Research Assistant Professor and CEEO Director Merredith Portsmore received awards for using technology in their teaching.
  • A white woman with curly red and brown hair stands overlooking a lab below.
    Dean Karen Panetta discussed the importance of K-12 engineering education to get women interested in the field from a young age.
  • A woman stands among many stone statues.
    While studying abroad in Talloires, France, BEST scholar Talisa Watts is seeing global health engineering and policy at work.
  • An image of blue and yellow cells.
    Research from Tufts University on a non-invasive optical imaging technique that detects changes in cellular metabolism is featured by the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.
  • A white woman with short grey hair sits in a dark room next to a computer.
    Bridge Professor Susan Landau spoke to Open Source about her career and evolutions in cybersecurity.
  • A white woman with brown hair stands at a Tufts podium in academic regalia
    As part of WBUR's BioBoom series, Paula Soteropoulos, E89, J89, EG90, A20P, President and CEO of Akcea Therapeutics, and an honored speaker at Commencement, discussed the growing role of women in biotechnology and life sciences in the Boston area. 
  • Snow-capped mountains with green fir trees in front.
    Civil engineering major and BEST scholar Talisa Watts reflects on her first week in France as part of the Tufts in Talloires program, and how she's learning to communicate in spite of a language barrier.
  • A white woman with short blonde hair speaks into a microphone in front of an audience.
    Emily Airoldi, who received a master's degree in Engineering Management at Tufts Gordon Institute this year, reflects on her experience in the program.
  • A figure image of the paper-nose
    In a new paper, researchers printed chemoresponsive dyes and chemiresistive inks on paper to develop a "paper-nose" optoelectronic sensor for volatile gases in air.
  • Michelle Chan in Hong Kong
    As her time studying abroad in Hong Kong draws to a close, Michelle Chan, E19, is no longer questioning her own skills.

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