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Courses

 

 
 
Fall Semester
 
 
EN 81- Enviromental Exposures and Human Disease
offered occasionally (view recent syllabus)

Instructor:
 Prof. Kurt Pennell

Prerequisites:
none
 
 

Linkages between chemical and biological exposures and human disease. Case studies of Parkinson's disease and leukemia. Fundamental principles of environmental contamination and toxicity. The final project applies engineering practices to prevent and reduce exposure to environmental toxicants.

 
     
     
 

CEE 213 - Transport Principles in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering
offered annually (view recent syllabus)

Instructor:
 Prof. Andrew Ramsburg

Prerequisites:
Fluid Mechanics and Differential Equations or Consent of Instructor

 
 


Identification, protection, and management of water sources are important objectives for Environmental and Water Resources Engineers throughout the world.  Although the quality and quantity of source water may be influenced by global processes, they are profoundly and directly affected by the local environment.  Local environmental systems are often quantitatively described by considering fundamental processes on the scale of fractions to multiples of meters.  These processes may be grouped into two classes: transformation (physical and/or chemical change) and transport (movement of specified quantities).  This course will focus on foundational aspects of mass, momentum, and energy transport.  Consideration of these conservative quantities will lead to descriptions of fluid phase flow and species transport.  Because transformation and species transport are coupled, this course will also incorporate descriptions of interphase mass transfer and chemical reaction kinetics.  The final portion of the course will be devoted to the development of reactor models employed in both natural and engineered systems.

Transport Principles will benefit students who are interested in the processes that control the quality and quantity of water in natural and engineered environments.  The course is designed to provide students entering the Environmental and Water Resources Engineering (EWRE) graduate program a solid theoretical foundation in transport phenomena, as well as an introduction to reactor engineering.  Subsequent courses in the EWRE program will build upon (or extend) various aspects of the material presented in this course to describe the quantity and quality of water in specific settings (e.g., surface water quality and river hydraulics).

 
     
     
 
Spring Semester
 
 

CEE 32 - Environmental Engineering Principles
offered annually (view recent syllabus)

Instructor:
 Prof. Kurt Pennell

Prerequisites:
ES 2, MATH 12, CHEM 1 or 11 or 16, and PHY 11

 
 

Water quantity and quality, air quality, energy utilization, climate change, and sustainability. Material and energy balance. Chemical and biological transformations. Elementary transport and fate modeling. Quantitative description of natural and engineered processes affecting environmental sustainability at local, regional, and global scales.
 
     
     
 

CEE 132 - Environmental Engineering Processes
offered annually (view recent syllabus)

Instructor:
 Prof. Andrew Ramsburg or Prof. John Durant

Prerequisites:
CEE 30-Environmental Chemistry and CEE 32 - Environmental Engineering Principles
or Consent of Instructor

 
 

Environmental engineers rely upon a succession of unit operations when designing treatments that remove contaminants from air, water or soil.  This course focuses on the fundamental chemical, physical, and biological processes that comprise unit operations commonly employed in environmental engineering. Consideration of these processes will enable rational design and effective assessment of selected unit operations. This course will benefit students who are interested in processes or unit operations commonly employed to control air and water pollution.  The course is designed for undergraduate learners pursuing a degree in environmental engineering, or a related discipline.  Subsequent senior-level courses build upon various aspects of the material presented in this course to design water and wastewater treatment plants, air pollution controls, and environmental restorations. 
 
     
     
 

CEE 143 - Site Remediation
offered annually (view recent syllabus)

Instructor:
 Prof. Andrew Ramsburg

Prerequisite:
CEE 12 - Introducation to Hydraulic Engineering and CEE 32 - Envrionmental Engineering Principles, or Consent of Instructor

 
 

Treatment of contaminated subsurface environment poses a complex challenge for engineers.  While the regulatory framework for clean-up is well established, methods to identify, monitor, and remediate contaminated sites continue to evolve and demand a detailed understanding of the subsurface environment.  This course will rigorously explore the fundamental processes upon which conventional and innovative remediation technologies are based.  Knowledge about these fundamental processes will be integrated with an understanding of site characterization and applicable regulations, to enable design of site-specific treatment systems for the remediation of the subsurface environment.       This course will benefit students who will work to: assess the appropriateness of remediation technologies at specific sites; design and implement remediation systems; grant permits for remedial activities; assimilate and interpret site data for to quantify the effectiveness of remediation. 
 
     
     
 
CEE 230 - Reactive Transport in Porous Media
offered in odd years (view recent syllabus)

Instructor:
 Prof. Andrew Ramsburg

Prerequisite:
Transport Principles in EWRE (CEE 213) or Consent of Instructor

 
 

Accurate assessment and management of polluted groundwater requires a detailed understanding of migration pathways and mechanisms, both biotic and abiotic.  These mechanisms, however, are not unique to the subsurface environment or even environmental engineering.  This course will rigorously explore the fundamental processes by which components (e.g., contaminants) are transported in porous media.  Applications will focus on the contaminated subsurface environment; however, extensions to other systems of engineering interest will be included (e.g., packed bed reactors, membranes, filtration, biological tissues, and other porous materials).  Upon completion of this course, students will have the foundation on which to base critical assessments of component transport in complex porous media systems. This course will benefit learners who are designing/conducting/analyzing  data obtained from systems containing porous media or developing/employing mathematical models to predict component transport.
 
     

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