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Department of Computer Science

Peter Love

Secondary Appointment
Associate Professor, Physics and Astronomy

Peter Love

Peter Love

Secondary Appointment
Associate Professor, Physics and Astronomy

Phone 617-627-1065
574 Boston Avenue, Room 406C
Biography: 

Peter Love completed his undergraduate degree in Physics at Oxford University in 1997, during which he was awarded summer internships at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and at the Joint European Torus nuclear fusion project. He completed a D.Phil in Theoretical Physics at Oxford University under the supervision of Dr. J. M. Yeomans and Prof. P. V. Coveney in 2001, specializing in lattice-gas cellular automata models of complex fluids followed by a one year post-doctoral appointment with Prof. P. V. Coveney at the Centre for Computational Science, Department of Chemistry, Queen Mary, University of London, and co-authored a 3.3 million GBP Grid based computing proposal funded by the EPSRC. In March 2002 he took a DARPA funded post-doctoral position at Tufts University Department of Mathematics working with Prof. Bruce Boghosian on the implementation of classical and quantum lattice gas models on future quantum computers. He worked at D-Wave Systems from November 2004-May 2006 as Senior Application Scientist, with responsibility for the elucidation of quantum algorithms for early superconducting quantum computers. In July 2006 he joined the Faculty of Haverford College as Assistant Professor of Physics. He was the recipient of the 2009 Lindback award for Distinguished Teaching and received an NSF CAREER award in 2010 and in 2012 I was promoted to Associate Professor. Since July 2015 he has been an Associate Professor of Physics at Tufts University. In 2018, he joined the staff of Brookhaven National Laboratory through a dual appointment as Senior Scientist in the Computational Science Initiative, held concurrently with his Tufts appointment.

Education: 
D. Phil, Physics, Lady Margaret hall, Oxford University, 2001
M. Phys, Physics, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University, 1997

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