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School of Engineering

Brian Timko

Assistant Professor
Biomedical Engineering

Brian Timko

Brian Timko

Assistant Professor
Biomedical Engineering

Phone 617-627-0443
Science and Technology Center, Room 266B
4 Colby Street, Medford, MA
Research: 
nanoelectronics, biosensing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, drug delivery
Biography: 

Brian Timko graduated from Lehigh University with B.S. degrees in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and from Harvard University with a Ph.D. in Chemistry. He completed his graduate studies in the laboratory of Professor Charles Lieber at Harvard, where he studied semiconductor nanowires and how they could be stably interfaced with living cells and tissue. He completed postdoctoral studies with Professor Robert Langer at MIT and Professor Daniel Kohane at Boston Children's Hospital. During that time, Timko studied nanocomposite materials for cardiac tissue engineering and remotely-triggered drug delivery, and subsequently, he was an instructor in anaesthesiology at Boston Children's Hospital. In 2016, he joined Tufts School of Engineering as an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Education: 
Ph.D., Chemistry, Harvard University, 2009
A.M., Chemistry, Harvard University, 2004
B.S., Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, 2002
Professional Experience: 
2016-present:

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts School of Engineering

2013-2016:

Instructor in Anaesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston Children's Hospital

2009-2013:

Postdoctoral Fellow, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT

2009-2013:

Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Medical School, Boston Children's Hospital

Research Interests: 

Brian Timko's research interests lie at the intersection of materials science, chemistry, and biology, with a major focus on nanotechnology and nanoscale interfaces between solid-state and biological systems. Central to his laboratory's strategy is the bottom-up paradigm, whereby nanomaterials are synthesized with rationally-controlled electrical, optical, and chemical properties, then assembled into biological systems at physiological conditions. This strategy is leveraged to achieve advances in three interrelated areas: nanoelectronics for biosensing, nanocomposites for tissue engineering, and externally-triggered drug delivery systems.

Selected Honors and Awards: 
2016: MIT Sloan Healthcare Innovations Prize
2016: Anesthesia Foundation Distinguished Trailblazer Award, Boston Children's Hospital
2015: Grand Prize and Audience Choice Award, 100k Pitch Competition, MIT
2011: NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award
2008: Gold Award, Materials Research Society
2006: William H. Peterson Award, American Chemical Society
2002: National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
2000: Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarship
2000: Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
Teaching/Courses Taught: 
BME-5: Junior Design and Research I