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Showing News articles tagged with Biomedical Engineering

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  • A brain image
    The Initiative for Neural Science, Disease & Engineering (INSciDE@Tufts) and The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) are collaborating on an initiative to decipher the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases by employing a new generation of human stem-cell-based experimental technologies. 
  • A group of women sitting together and laughing

    By the numbers, the undergraduate class is one for the record books, with women making up 49 percent of the School of Engineering's incoming students.

  • A lawn on campus with fall colours in the trees

    In 2018 and 2019, eight new faculty members join the School of Engineering.

  • Prospective students interested in learning more about engineering graduate programs at Tufts are invited to join Dean of Graduate Education Karen Panetta for an information session and meet and greet on September 6 from 6:00-7:00 pm.
  • Vibrant green rods bent in an arc
    A group of Tufts researchers created materials that move in response to light, leading to possible applications for solar-powered products. 
  • A man in a grey sweater stands in a lab with his arms crossed, smiling.
    Assistant Professor Xiaocheng Jiang and a group of Tufts researchers examined new developments in support extracellular electron transfer (EET) processes, which could have applications in renewable energy conversion and bioelectronics.
  • An arm with a small computer chip and a bandage attached to it.
    A team of researchers led by Tufts faculty and alumni have created a prototype of a "smart" bandage that can monitor the conditions of a wound and deliver drug treatment. 
  • A headshot of a white man with brown hair
    Assistant Professor Brian Timko was named to the inaugural class of Young Innovators in NanoBiotech, established by the journal Nano Research
  • A brown man with shoulder-length curly black hair stands against a chalkboard with writing on it.
    Tufts researchers including Associate Professor Shuchin Aeron (pictured), and Professors Fiorenzo Omenetto and Eric Miller, are participating in a study that uses sensors to monitor cognitive performance and biomechanics. 
  • An image of blue and yellow cells.
    Research from Tufts University on a non-invasive optical imaging technique that detects changes in cellular metabolism is featured by the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

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