Skip to main content
School of Engineering

Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Biomedical Engineering

To filter by date, you must select both Year and Month
  • Diagram of components of the silk/extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system.
    Researchers at Tufts have created a novel 3D brain tissue system that better mimics the tumor environment in patients, allowing detailed study of tumor biology.
  • Faculty in the Laboratory for Living Devices invite the public to L²D Day on November 7 in the SEC
    Researchers at Tufts’ Laboratory for Living Devices link materials like silk and paper with technology, medicine, and diagnostics.
  • Professor Sergio Fantini and members of the DOIT Lab
    Professor Sergio Fantini and the Diffuse Optical Imaging of Tissue Lab find new ways to non-invasively study biological tissue at greater depths.
  • Bovine skeletal muscle cells grown in the presence of myoglobin or hemoglobin
    Cultured meat could reduce resources required in meat production, with a smaller environmental footprint relative to animal farming.
  • Passing a voltage across a heating element connected to the silk bilayer
    Scientists engineer on-demand high resolution wrinkling for reversible printing and thermal regulation.
  • 3D silk scaffold treated with ECM and seeded with glioblastoma cells.
    Researchers find the use of brain-like extracellular matrix allows cell growth and treatment to more closely replicate physiological response.
  • close-up of silk fibers
    Fiorenzo Omenetto, Dean of Research and Frank C. Doble Professor, discusses the potential of silk to shape future technologies in Scientific American.
  • Dean's Lecture with Andy Youniss of Rocket Software on October 24
    On Thursday, October 24, join the School of Engineering for a Dean's Lecture with Andy Youniss, President and CEO of Rocket Software.
  • An image of blue and yellow cells.
    Researchers including Professor Irene Georgakoudi, Department of Biomedical Engineering, use laser microscopy technique to detect ovarian metastatic cancer.
  • A caterpillar
    Engineers at Tufts suggest that coupling trends in cultured meat and entomophagy (i. e., eating insects) could include future steaks composed of caterpillar tissue.

Pages