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  • An aerial photo of a city
    A first-of-its-kind study led by Tufts researchers, in collaboration with Somerville officials and citizens, will measure indoor air quality and comfort in multifamily housing developments near busy roadways. 
  • A woman stands against a wall, smiling
    Center for STEM Diversity Director Ellise LaMotte reflects on the successes, challenges, and future plans of the Center as it celebrates a decade of service at Tufts.
  • Solar panels on a roof

    Assistant Professor Deborah Sunter and colleagues found that racial inequality persists in the deployment of rooftop solar panels.

  • A woman sits in a hospital room and smiles
    Penelope Seagrave, a master's student in Human Factors Engineering, discusses her experience in the Human-Computer Interaction certificate program at Tufts.
  • A person walking besides an elephant statue on campus
    In a new blog post, chemical engineering doctoral candidate Ece Gulsan explains some stress-relieving yoga practices for students looking to unwind and refresh.
  • An illustration of heads made up of puzzle pieces
    Bioengineering master's student Manisha Raghavan's latest graduate student blog post focuses on the importance of mental health among students.
  • A group of students touring campus
    The School of Engineering attracted 4,348 undergraduate applications, up from 4,062 last year.
  • A crowd in an auditorium watching a presentation
    Students in the M.S. program in Innovation & Management pitched inventive and high-tech ventures during culmination of fall Innovation Sprints.
  • A man smiles at the camera while sitting on a desk in a classroom
    Tufts researchers including Associate Professor Matthew Panzer (pictured), Professor Sameer Sonkusale, and graduate students Huan Qin and Rachel Owyeung have developed highly stretchable, gelatin biopolymer-supported deep eutectic solvent (DES) gel electrolytes as a promising nonvolatile alternative to hydrogels for ionic skin applications. 
  • A woman and a child in a toy store looking at a shelf
    Marina Umaschi Bers, a professor and chair of the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development who heads the Developmental Technologies Research Group and has an adjunct appointment in the Department of Computer Science, offers options for choosing high-tech toys for kids. 

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