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Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Research news

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  • An overhead shot of an atrium
    Chemical Engineering major Christine Jahn, E20, publishes fuel cell catalyst research.
  • Dr. Thien delivers Botsaris Lecture in front of crowd
    Dr. Michael Thien of Merck & Co. Inc. delivered this year’s Gregory Botsaris Lecture in Chemical and Biological Engineering.
  • Cover of Advanced Healthcare Materials
    Associate Professor Qiaobing Xu’s research on protein delivery through nanoparticles was published on the cover of the most recent edition of Advanced Healthcare Materials.
  • Illustration showing the silhouette of a human head and chest with lungs inside, set on a computer chip. Other elements include lines and circles pointing to lungs, and a DNA symbol.
    When Tufts computer scientists put their skills to work, they can change the world. Here are four projects addressing medical questions and challenges.
  • Headshot composite of Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and Ph.D. alumnus Anthony D'Angelo, each smiling at camera
    Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and Ph.D. alumnus Anthony D’Angelo recently published research focused on the design of stretchable, self-healing, lithium-based battery electrolytes.
  • Robot Shafer looks into the camera, while robot Dempster is visible behind

    Robots can transform health care, transportation, work, and more for the better, as long as we imbue them with a human principle: do no harm. The Human-Robot Interaction Lab does that research.

  • A professor and a student with a large box with a QR code design.
    Assistant Professor Jivko Sinapov, the James Schmolze Assistant Professor in Computer Science, was one of ten winners in the nationwide Verizon 5G EdTech Challenge, and sees it as an opportunity to continue to mentor students.
  • The geometry of a moth's eye provides inspiration for a 3D printed antenna that absorbs specific microwave frequencies from any direction. Credit: Hojat Nejad.

    Tufts electrical engineers and chemical engineers create novel optical devices, including an omnidirectional microwave antenna inspired by a moth's eye.

  • Professor Shafiqul Islam
    In a special issue of the Journal of Hydrology, Professor Shafiqul Islam (pictured) and MIT's Professor Lawrence Susskind explain how to use complexity science and negotiation theory to resolve complicated water issues.
  • Solar panels on a home's roof

    In Scientific American, Assistant Professor Deborah Sunter explains a Tufts and UC Berkeley study's findings that racial and ethnic minorities have less access to solar power, regardless of income.

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