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Engineering News

Showing News articles tagged with Chemical and Biological Engineering

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  • ZwitterCo at 100k New Ventures Competition
    Check in with ZwitterCo CEO Alex Rappaport, E17 and EG19, to learn how winning the $100k New Ventures Competition in 2018 boosted his team's company.
  • Dr. Thien delivers Botsaris Lecture in front of crowd
    Dr. Michael Thien of Merck & Co. Inc. delivered this year’s Gregory Botsaris Lecture in Chemical and Biological Engineering.
  • From left, Belinda Xian, E18 and EG19, Bhushan Suwal, E19, and Erica Santos look on as Melanie Nettler, A19, hugs Coach Don Megerle.
    This year, a number of School of Engineering students, faculty, and alumni ran the Boston Marathon with the Tufts Marathon Team and raised money for charity and critical research.
  • Screencap of Tufts Medford/Somerville campus map
    Want to learn more about engineering graduate programs at Tufts? Take our new virtual campus tour!
  • Headshot composite of Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and Ph.D. alumnus Anthony D'Angelo, each smiling at camera
    Associate Professor Matthew Panzer and Ph.D. alumnus Anthony D’Angelo recently published research focused on the design of stretchable, self-healing, lithium-based battery electrolytes.
  • An image of the Science & Engineering Complex at Tufts University.
    Tufts students and alumni Andrew Bourhis, Elizabeth Buechler, and Thomas George have been named Fellows in the 2019 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program.
  • The geometry of a moth's eye provides inspiration for a 3D printed antenna that absorbs specific microwave frequencies from any direction. Credit: Hojat Nejad.

    Tufts electrical engineers and chemical engineers create novel optical devices, including an omnidirectional microwave antenna inspired by a moth's eye.

  • Sensing threads prepared with bromothymol blue (top thread), methyl red (middle thread) and MnTPP (bottom thread) are exposed to ammonia at 0 ppm (left panel) 50 ppm (middle panel) and 1000 ppm (right panel).
    Equipment- and training-free textile detectors, developed by Ph.D. candidate Rachel Owyeung, Associate Professor Matthew Panzer, and Professor Sameer Sonkusale, could be used in public health, workplace safety, military, and rescue applications.
  • Julia Prusaczyk, E18, jumped from studying chemical engineering to being a baseball development analyst for the St. Louis Cardinals.
  • A Tufts research team — including Assistant Professor Ayse Asatekin, the John A. and Dorothy M. Adams Faculty Development Professor, and alumna Ilin Sadeghi — developed a low-cost membrane to separate oil and water for environmental remediation and wastewater treatment.

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